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Archive for the ‘Self – Help’ Category

What's-Really-Your-PassionAn executive once said, “There is nothing wrong with wanting to make money. However, it should not be the sole objective. The end goal should be to provide a service or product that people need.”

No matter what your passion is in life, should you decide to turn that passion into reality, the end goal must go beyond just making money – it can solve a problem, provide enjoyment or peace, make life easier, etc. And, it’s not as hard as you might imagine.

For example, say your passion is pottery. The product that you will create will satisfy the need of those who enjoy the beauty of pottery. You will touch their emotions. Perhaps, you will awaken senses and memories that have been dormant and bring to your customer – as anyone who appreciates art knows – hours, if not days and years of peace and enjoyment.

You may ask, “Can my pottery do that?” The answer is “Yes.”

Take what you believe to be “your passion” and break it down to your core passion. They key thing to discover is what is behind your passion. Ask yourself, “What am I trying to create? What am I really interested in? What are the true feelings or emotions behind my passion?” Delve deep into your thoughts and ask yourself, “How does my passion affect other people? How can others benefit from my passion? “Does it solve a problem or provide a service or product that other would need?”

Through examination, you may discover not only what is really your passion, but also a renewed sense of passion… for your passion.

©2014Bob Garner – Bob is a funny motivational speaker who teaches his audiences how to achieve goals, diminish worry, stress and fear and live more productive and peaceful lives.

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For those in the corporate world who have to travel to earn their pay, many times we find ourselves in the presence of unpleasant people.

From plane trips to restaurants to meetings or events, an occasional rude person expresses his or her discomfort at something we may have said or should have said or did or didn’t do.

Sometimes their unhappiness is expressed by a few choice words, a nasty look, or – if we are driving and someone feels we are not driving fast enough – the mere dexterity of their fingers communicates the message. Hopefully, you don’t feel compelled to respond to this form of communication, other insults or goofy looks that others throw your way. It’s easy to respond; however, it’s more challenging – if not rewarding – to not respond. The next time you get the urge to respond, remember this story:

Buddha was once asked by his disciples why he didn’t respond to the insults that others would cast toward him. Buddha said, “Imagine what would happen if someone placed a gift at your feet and you chose to ignore it. Or someone sent you a letter and you did not open it.” The disciples answered that it would be returned to the original owner. Buddha responded with one word, “Exactly.”

Just let the anger or insult from another person pass you by, and, like a boomerang, it will have to go back to its owner. That is the one of the best and quickest ways to deal with mean people.

©2014BobGarner – See how these corporations brought the WOW factor to their eventshttp://tinyurl.com/62u2u2y

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Ever have an idea, but slammed the door on it saying, “That won’t work” or “That’s crazy”? As children, we were taught and actually encouraged to be creative.

Strangely enough, as we continue through the educational process, creativity becomes discouraged. We are encouraged to “think outside of the box,” as long as we remain enclosed in a “larger box.” (By the “larger box,” I mean the box where we are not to “ rock the boat,” “question the status quo,” etc.)

This “box within a box” style of creativity continues through our working years. Many employers will say that they want their employees to be more creative, when it comes to selling products or services, finding solutions to customer’s problems or building better teams, yet many of the ideas that employees offer are shot down, faster than you can blink.

Occasionally, a good idea is let through the door, and – as the writer and inventor Arthur C. Clarke put forth – those new ideas will pass through three periods. The first being “It can’t be done.” The second, “It probably can be done, but it’s not worth doing,” and the third, “I knew it was a good idea all along!” (If you’re in corporate, that should ring a bell!)

While others can slam the door on our ideas, oftentimes we do it ourselves, before anyone else has the opportunity. From negativity and self-doubt to poor planning and unrealistic time frames, we can kill our own ideas, instead of following a few steps to allow our ideas to take root and grow.

With that said, here are a few tips to help you open the door to your ideas – and let them grow:

Keep a Notebook Handy:
While this sounds elementary, have you ever had an idea and then scrambled around for a piece of paper on which to write it down? Perhaps you had an idea, thought you would remember it and then later, while trying to remember it, you couldn’t. The English philosopher Sir Francis Bacon once said, “Write down the thoughts of the moment. Those that come unsought for are commonly the most valuable.” So, take a tip from Sir Bacon and write down your ideas.

Time to Contemplate:
When you can find a quiet moment, review your ideas. Let your brain chew on them, and see how you inwardly feel about your idea. Have a conversation with yourself. Ask yourself questions. Write out the pros and cons to your ideas and study them. Make sure to avoid the knee-jerk responses of negativity that can arise. (Remember a quote from Albert Einstein, “If at first the idea is not absurd, then there is no hope for it.”) View your idea with an open mind, never forgetting that (usually) if you were given the idea – you were also given the way to make it a reality.

From Idea to Reality:
If after your self-conversation, you view that your idea is viable, write down some steps that you should take to turn that idea into reality. Don’t be too specific, just a few basic steps. Picasso attested that one should have an idea of what one wanted to do, but it should be a vague idea. Look at the basic steps and choose the most logical first step and then act on it. Don’t set up time frames that will force you to move fast or deadlines that are impossible to meet. Just let your idea flow and grow on its own. As you move forward, adjust accordingly. Sometimes one idea leads to another better idea, so you dismiss the first idea and move on to the next.

What is important to remember is that when you act on your idea, you step out of the “herd mentality” that most people have. The masses have never developed or created anything. Progress happens when individuals take ideas and move on them. As a funny motivational speaker, I’ve always appreciated the wisdom of entrepreneur and author Jim Rohn who once stated, “Ideas can be life-changing. Sometimes all you need to open the door is just one more good idea.” Follow these three tips to open the door to your ideas.

A funny motivational speaker and funny motivational keynote speaker, Bob is known for his creative way of reinforcing specific points in his presentations with entertainment. Additionally, Bob is an author and syndicated writer on personal and professional development. His new Twitter site offers tweets on abundance, peace, happiness and success – go to @Abundancefaucet.

©2013 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. Feel free to post this article, but please use my byline and resource box. Thank you.

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How many times have you sat down on a plane and ignored the person next to you? I admit I have, but am glad that I no longer do.  What changed me was a serendipitous meeting with a chief editor from a prestigious magazine that not only provided a wonderful business opportunity, but also a new friend.

If you have ever had a serendipitous meeting with someone that benefited your life, please comment and share below in the comment section. Check out his view of our meeting in this blog: http://goo.gl/Srm0W

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If a brain surgeon were going to perform a delicate operation on your brain, perfection and precision would be highly appreciated. However, as the brain surgeon would tell you, (and as you will note in all the hospital forms that you have to sign,) neither perfection nor precision is absolutely guaranteed.

Perfection in doing anything is very difficult to obtain. Striving for perfection in trying to achieve your personal goal or work objective is not only difficult to obtain, but also unnecessary. What is necessary is striving for excellence and progress.

There is a subtle, yet important, difference between excellence and perfection. Excellence means doing the very best that you possibly can at all times. For work objectives, that means showing up on time for appointments, providing your customers with outstanding customer service, keeping your promises, and so on. For personal goals, that might mean a variety of things which you know you have to do in order for your goal to be achieved.

Striving for perfection in both your personal goals and work objectives means constantly stressing over whether or not you have done the best that you could do, compulsively anguishing over details, fixating on minutia, and analyzing and reanalyzing all of your decisions, etc.

The need for perfection stems primarily from having a fear of making a mistake or the fear of being looked upon as a failure. Both of these fears are feelings, and as I say in my seminars, “Feelings can be changed and whatever can be changed can be controlled.”

Here are a few steps to help you control your fears and strive for excellence, not perfection:

1) Study Successful People: Ask yourself if they reached their goals or objectives without ever making a mistake or without ever having failed. Every successful person has made a “ton” of mistakes and failed many times.
 
As a corporate motivational speaker, I have read hundreds of books on the lives of successful people and I can’t recall any that were “overly” concerned with details. In fact, a book called, “Profiles of Genius” (Prometheus Books, 1993) featured a study on 13 creative men who changed the world. Not one of these men suffered from “paralysis of analysis.” They were not micro-managers. Instead, they were all risk takers and macro-managers who weren’t bothered by mistakes or failure and had flexible plans and strategies. Mistakes and failing are how you learn, and the willingness to keep going is what makes people successful.  
 
2) Evaluate Goals or Objectives: Are you trying to accomplish too much at one time? Are you more concerned as to how you will appear to others, as opposed to focusing on the next step of your plan?
 
If you are more concerned with how you will appear to others, as opposed to focusing on your next step in your plan, you are too concerned with others opinions, which is a complete waste of time and energy. Yes, with work, you may need your boss or customer to like what you do; however, if you are doing your best and striving for excellence, how can they justly complain? If they do, you can go and rework your plan. If they still complain, you either have a whiny customer that you’d be better off without or a whiny boss, which you also would be better off without.
 
As for your goals, how can anyone judge you or your goal, until you have achieved that goal? People wait until a book has been completely written or a painting has been totally finished before either is judged, so why should your goal be any different? 
 
3) Pride in Your Work: Have pride in your work or your goal, but don’t invest your entire ego in it and expect others to give you a standing ovation. If you are striving for excellence and have achieved your goal or work objective, step back and congratulate yourself quietly. Sure, we all need to be patted on the back and told that we did a good job. However, the most important person to tell you that you have done a good job… is you!
 
Unless you’re operating on someone’s brain or performing some other life-saving task, perfection is always appreciated, but it is not guaranteed. In most cases, perfection is not required – only excellence and progress. Excellence comes from doing the best that you possibly can every time; making sure that you aren’t trying to do too much: discharging your concern with regard to others judgments, and keeping your self-esteem high, while releasing the need for others to boost your ego. Progress comes from accepting the fact that mistakes will happen and that you may fail from time-to-time. Learning from those mistakes or failures is wisdom.

Bob Garner is a funny motivational speaker who also provides corporate event entertainment with a message. He is a syndicated writer and author.

©2013 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. Feel free to post this article, but please use my byline and resource box. Thank you.

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A reflection on Reagan from a guy who sat behind him at church

When I lived in the Los Angeles area, I often attended Bel-Air Presbyterian Church. I wasn’t Presbyterian (my wife was at the time), but I knew that President Reagan and his wife attended this church, after he left office. My wife had met Reagan when he was in office. She was a professional singer and had a Command Performance for him that was simulcast on PBS. I always admired Reagan, so I wanted to meet him.

I remember walking into this beautiful church and trying to figure out where Reagan would sit, if he showed up. I looked over the pews and found one with two cardboard signs that read “RR” and “NR.” Bingo! In the pew behind the one with the “RR” was another cardboard sign that read “SS,” which I knew was secret service, so I sat down next to that sign.

A few minutes before service started, there was a flush of activity and then a large man entered the main door, looked around, stepped aside – and in walked Reagan and Nancy. The place would go crazy. Reagan and Nancy would wave and say “Hello” to people and then they sat down in the pew in front of me. I thought I would pass out.

Then members of the congregation would come up for photos, handing babies over to be held, etc. They both handled this onslaught with grace. On that day, I leaned over the pew and said to Reagan, “Mr. President, I enjoyed your autobiography.” I got no response. I said it again, and still got no response. Then Nancy looked at me and said, “Oh, he can’t hear you.” She jabbed her elbow into his side and said, “Ron, he liked your book,” to which Reagan then turned around and we had a lovely conversation.

After that first meeting, I spoke to one of the pastors at the church and commented on how “cool” it was to meet Reagan. The pastor told me that Reagan was a good member of the church and that he did so much for so many people that never got reported.

He told me that both Reagan and Nancy would participate in a number of programs such as the “Secret Santa” drives and deliver food and gifts to the less fortunate; he would visit with people who sent him letters or spoke with him and was quick to whip out his checkbook to help someone, as well as provide inspiration and guidance when asked.

Reagan lived by the tenant of “Do unto others,” as well as the saying “To much has been given, much is expected.” While some treated him with disdain, he treated people with dignity and compassion. Even though nothing is really expected from an ex-President, he knew that he had been given/earned a place in history as a leader and undoubtedly felt that in that position, his duty was to give what he could. To those whom he visited with food and gifts and those who asked for and received monetary aid or words of comfort, Reagan will
never be forgotten.

Quietly, without media coverage or publicity, Reagan changed the lives of those he met and helped. And whether you liked his policies when he was President or not, you can’t argue with a changed life.

©2013 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. Feel free to post this article, but please use my byline.

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I have been fascinated with the world of the paranormal since I was a child. In fact, this fascination led me to a career where I use demonstrations of mind reading and ESP in the speeches on personal/professional development that I deliver to corporate audiences, worldwide.

The story you are about to read is a true story about an encounter with a professional psychic whose lessons on achieving success changed my life.

When I was in college, way back in 1978, my major was radio/TV broadcasting. For one class, I was asked to form a crew and find someone who was “interesting” to interview.

Where I lived, the “pickings” were few. However, I finally found a professional psychic whom I thought would fit the bill of “interesting,” nicely. His name was Harold W. Hubbard and, at that time, I had no idea how much this man would influence my life.

Upon arrival, my crew and I met an impressive man. He was dressed like a regular businessman and his home was nicely decorated. He greeted us warmly and patiently answered the questions I proposed with regard to his work and life. He, also, told me some amazing things about me, which of course ignited my own interest in the paranormal.

Right before we were ready to pack up our gear and leave, I asked Mr. Hubbard one more question. “Mr. Hubbard,” I stated, “Do you have any tips on success?”

He looked at me and paused for a moment. He said that he did have a few tips for success that he would be happy to share. Here is what he told me…

Frills: Look for quality over quantity. Having quality is more important than having “quantity.”

Thrills: Be careful as to where you go, what you choose to do to, and with whom you associate.

Spills: Don’t waste any opportunities or ideas. Write down the ideas that you have so that don’t “spill” to the floor and disappear. Even if you have no plans to work on your ideas right now, write them down so that if the opportunity arises to implement your idea you’ll be ready.

Skills: Investigate the talents or skills you may need to achieve your goals and hone those skills.

Be on top of circumstances. Instead of waiting for the opportunity or circumstance to appear; create the opportunity. Decide what it is that you want to do and then work to make it happen.

After we left his office, the crew and I discussed our experience and we were all delighted as to how much we enjoyed meeting this “interesting” man and how we all felt better for having done so.

Mr. Hubbard may not have known (or did he) how his tips for success would eventually influence my life as I integrated those tips into my own journey as a successful entrepreneur. The lessons on success that this psychic taught me then are still viable today and are excellent tips for anyone who in interested in achieving success.

Considering that this all happened back in 1978, you may be asking, “How did you remember his “tips for success” after 35 years?” It was easy. I wrote those tips down on the back of his business card and that business card has sat on my office desk for 35 years and is still there today!

Bob Garner is recognized as one of the leading funny motivational speakers and trade show magicians.  He is known worldwide for his demonstrations of mind reading and ESP in his presentations to reinforce his message in an entertaining way.

©2013 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the whole article, the byline and author resource links.

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