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If a brain surgeon were going to perform a delicate operation on your brain, perfection and precision would be highly appreciated. However, as the brain surgeon would tell you, (and as you will note in all the hospital forms that you have to sign,) neither perfection nor precision is absolutely guaranteed.

Perfection in doing anything is very difficult to obtain. Striving for perfection in trying to achieve your personal goal or work objective is not only difficult to obtain, but also unnecessary. What is necessary is striving for excellence and progress.

There is a subtle, yet important, difference between excellence and perfection. Excellence means doing the very best that you possibly can at all times. For work objectives, that means showing up on time for appointments, providing your customers with outstanding customer service, keeping your promises, and so on. For personal goals, that might mean a variety of things which you know you have to do in order for your goal to be achieved.

Striving for perfection in both your personal goals and work objectives means constantly stressing over whether or not you have done the best that you could do, compulsively anguishing over details, fixating on minutia, and analyzing and reanalyzing all of your decisions, etc.

The need for perfection stems primarily from having a fear of making a mistake or the fear of being looked upon as a failure. Both of these fears are feelings, and as I say in my seminars, “Feelings can be changed and whatever can be changed can be controlled.”

Here are a few steps to help you control your fears and strive for excellence, not perfection:

1) Study Successful People: Ask yourself if they reached their goals or objectives without ever making a mistake or without ever having failed. Every successful person has made a “ton” of mistakes and failed many times.
 
As a corporate motivational speaker, I have read hundreds of books on the lives of successful people and I can’t recall any that were “overly” concerned with details. In fact, a book called, “Profiles of Genius” (Prometheus Books, 1993) featured a study on 13 creative men who changed the world. Not one of these men suffered from “paralysis of analysis.” They were not micro-managers. Instead, they were all risk takers and macro-managers who weren’t bothered by mistakes or failure and had flexible plans and strategies. Mistakes and failing are how you learn, and the willingness to keep going is what makes people successful.  
 
2) Evaluate Goals or Objectives: Are you trying to accomplish too much at one time? Are you more concerned as to how you will appear to others, as opposed to focusing on the next step of your plan?
 
If you are more concerned with how you will appear to others, as opposed to focusing on your next step in your plan, you are too concerned with others opinions, which is a complete waste of time and energy. Yes, with work, you may need your boss or customer to like what you do; however, if you are doing your best and striving for excellence, how can they justly complain? If they do, you can go and rework your plan. If they still complain, you either have a whiny customer that you’d be better off without or a whiny boss, which you also would be better off without.
 
As for your goals, how can anyone judge you or your goal, until you have achieved that goal? People wait until a book has been completely written or a painting has been totally finished before either is judged, so why should your goal be any different? 
 
3) Pride in Your Work: Have pride in your work or your goal, but don’t invest your entire ego in it and expect others to give you a standing ovation. If you are striving for excellence and have achieved your goal or work objective, step back and congratulate yourself quietly. Sure, we all need to be patted on the back and told that we did a good job. However, the most important person to tell you that you have done a good job… is you!
 
Unless you’re operating on someone’s brain or performing some other life-saving task, perfection is always appreciated, but it is not guaranteed. In most cases, perfection is not required – only excellence and progress. Excellence comes from doing the best that you possibly can every time; making sure that you aren’t trying to do too much: discharging your concern with regard to others judgments, and keeping your self-esteem high, while releasing the need for others to boost your ego. Progress comes from accepting the fact that mistakes will happen and that you may fail from time-to-time. Learning from those mistakes or failures is wisdom.

Bob Garner is a funny motivational speaker who also provides corporate event entertainment with a message. He is a syndicated writer and author.

©2013 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. Feel free to post this article, but please use my byline and resource box. Thank you.

A reflection on Reagan from a guy who sat behind him at church

When I lived in the Los Angeles area, I often attended Bel-Air Presbyterian Church. I wasn’t Presbyterian (my wife was at the time), but I knew that President Reagan and his wife attended this church, after he left office. My wife had met Reagan when he was in office. She was a professional singer and had a Command Performance for him that was simulcast on PBS. I always admired Reagan, so I wanted to meet him.

I remember walking into this beautiful church and trying to figure out where Reagan would sit, if he showed up. I looked over the pews and found one with two cardboard signs that read “RR” and “NR.” Bingo! In the pew behind the one with the “RR” was another cardboard sign that read “SS,” which I knew was secret service, so I sat down next to that sign.

A few minutes before service started, there was a flush of activity and then a large man entered the main door, looked around, stepped aside – and in walked Reagan and Nancy. The place would go crazy. Reagan and Nancy would wave and say “Hello” to people and then they sat down in the pew in front of me. I thought I would pass out.

Then members of the congregation would come up for photos, handing babies over to be held, etc. They both handled this onslaught with grace. On that day, I leaned over the pew and said to Reagan, “Mr. President, I enjoyed your autobiography.” I got no response. I said it again, and still got no response. Then Nancy looked at me and said, “Oh, he can’t hear you.” She jabbed her elbow into his side and said, “Ron, he liked your book,” to which Reagan then turned around and we had a lovely conversation.

After that first meeting, I spoke to one of the pastors at the church and commented on how “cool” it was to meet Reagan. The pastor told me that Reagan was a good member of the church and that he did so much for so many people that never got reported.

He told me that both Reagan and Nancy would participate in a number of programs such as the “Secret Santa” drives and deliver food and gifts to the less fortunate; he would visit with people who sent him letters or spoke with him and was quick to whip out his checkbook to help someone, as well as provide inspiration and guidance when asked.

Reagan lived by the tenant of “Do unto others,” as well as the saying “To much has been given, much is expected.” While some treated him with disdain, he treated people with dignity and compassion. Even though nothing is really expected from an ex-President, he knew that he had been given/earned a place in history as a leader and undoubtedly felt that in that position, his duty was to give what he could. To those whom he visited with food and gifts and those who asked for and received monetary aid or words of comfort, Reagan will
never be forgotten.

Quietly, without media coverage or publicity, Reagan changed the lives of those he met and helped. And whether you liked his policies when he was President or not, you can’t argue with a changed life.

©2013 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. Feel free to post this article, but please use my byline.

I have been fascinated with the world of the paranormal since I was a child. In fact, this fascination led me to a career where I use demonstrations of mind reading and ESP in the speeches on personal/professional development that I deliver to corporate audiences, worldwide.

The story you are about to read is a true story about an encounter with a professional psychic whose lessons on achieving success changed my life.

When I was in college, way back in 1978, my major was radio/TV broadcasting. For one class, I was asked to form a crew and find someone who was “interesting” to interview.

Where I lived, the “pickings” were few. However, I finally found a professional psychic whom I thought would fit the bill of “interesting,” nicely. His name was Harold W. Hubbard and, at that time, I had no idea how much this man would influence my life.

Upon arrival, my crew and I met an impressive man. He was dressed like a regular businessman and his home was nicely decorated. He greeted us warmly and patiently answered the questions I proposed with regard to his work and life. He, also, told me some amazing things about me, which of course ignited my own interest in the paranormal.

Right before we were ready to pack up our gear and leave, I asked Mr. Hubbard one more question. “Mr. Hubbard,” I stated, “Do you have any tips on success?”

He looked at me and paused for a moment. He said that he did have a few tips for success that he would be happy to share. Here is what he told me…

Frills: Look for quality over quantity. Having quality is more important than having “quantity.”

Thrills: Be careful as to where you go, what you choose to do to, and with whom you associate.

Spills: Don’t waste any opportunities or ideas. Write down the ideas that you have so that don’t “spill” to the floor and disappear. Even if you have no plans to work on your ideas right now, write them down so that if the opportunity arises to implement your idea you’ll be ready.

Skills: Investigate the talents or skills you may need to achieve your goals and hone those skills.

Be on top of circumstances. Instead of waiting for the opportunity or circumstance to appear; create the opportunity. Decide what it is that you want to do and then work to make it happen.

After we left his office, the crew and I discussed our experience and we were all delighted as to how much we enjoyed meeting this “interesting” man and how we all felt better for having done so.

Mr. Hubbard may not have known (or did he) how his tips for success would eventually influence my life as I integrated those tips into my own journey as a successful entrepreneur. The lessons on success that this psychic taught me then are still viable today and are excellent tips for anyone who in interested in achieving success.

Considering that this all happened back in 1978, you may be asking, “How did you remember his “tips for success” after 35 years?” It was easy. I wrote those tips down on the back of his business card and that business card has sat on my office desk for 35 years and is still there today!

Bob Garner is recognized as one of the leading funny motivational speakers and trade show magicians.  He is known worldwide for his demonstrations of mind reading and ESP in his presentations to reinforce his message in an entertaining way.

©2013 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the whole article, the byline and author resource links.

Do you ever wonder if an email recipient actually reads your whole email? We’re not talking a sales email, just a business correspondence that requires an action or some type of response. It appears that the attention span of many of those in corporate rivals that of a child opening gifts on their birthday – open a gift, look at it, open another, repeat, go do something else.

This is not only frustrating for the sender, but it also strikes at the heart of two important topics in corporate – communication and teamwork. If the email is about a customer issue, then you just hit on the third big corporate issue – customer service. To aid you in having your business emails read and the information supplied capturing the attention of the recipient to elicit a response, here are a few tips:

Subject Line:
Internet marketing experts know that keywords are crucial. Keywords are short 3- 4 word descriptions of your site and not only allow search engines to index and list your site, but also are the words that appear on Google or Bing that will catch your attention and get you to click on a certain site. Those in the book and newspaper industry know that they must grab you with the title or you’ll never buy the book or read the article. Therefore, use the same strategy for your emails. Put the main keywords of your email into the header. For example: Subject: Need your answer on XYZ project today” is more effective than “XYZ Project.” Keep the subject line short. If you need immediate action use “Action Item” in front of main message, then put keywords after, such as “Action Item: Need answer on XYZ Project today.”

Keep it Short:
Winston Churchill once said, “I’m going to make a long speech, because I’ve not had the time to prepare a short one.” Every professional speaker knows that the creation of a long speech takes far less time than that of a short one, because for a short speech, every word counts. In your email – every words counts!

While condensing your information into the smallest amount of words takes time, it does improve the odds of it being read in its entirety. Write out your email and look for ways to edit as much as possible, so that the main message is clear and concise. Aim for two to three short paragraphs. Contain the most important part of your message in the first paragraph, as most people will skim over your email, if it’s too long or has too many paragraphs.

Never Ask More Than 2 Questions:
If you ask more than 2 questions, there’s a good chance that none will be answered or only one, at the most, forcing you to send another email to the receiver. If you need to explain something and then ask a question, position the question into a separate paragraph. If you have more than 2 questions, you can put them in bullet point; however, the receiver will generally only answer the easiest question, forcing another email to get a complete answer. 

Call to Action:
If you need an answer or a response from the receiver, in addition to placing the words “Action Item” in your subject line, place a call to action statement at the end of your email such as, “Please respond to this email,” or ‘If you would please respond to these questions as soon as possible, it would be appreciated.” After this statement you can place your “Thank you,” “Regards,” etc.

Think advertising and marketing – there is always some call to action, because people need to be reminded that they need to act. If you are looking for an answer or a response, it helps to make sure that the receiver knows this. The receiver may still not respond, but the chances of them doing so is a bit higher.

Signature Box:
Make sure you have your complete information in your “sig box” – where your name and company info should be. Include a phone number and any other appropriate contact information. Watch any corporate logos, as they can sometimes (due to the large number of firewall providers) send an email to a spam folder – despite what your company’s tech person says. True, if you’re sending an email to a co-worker, they already know who you are; however, adding appropriate information in your sig box not only looks more professional, but it can also provide additional information that may grab the attention of the reader.

The Power of the CC:
You can follow these tips and still not receive a reply, which is extremely frustrating. Most recipients aren’t any busier than you, but many are disorganized or lack professionalism. Sometimes the recipient doesn’t have an answer, so your message is ignored. In a perfect world, he/she should still get back to you to let you know your email has at least been received.

If your email is vitally important – like a customer needs an answer – and you find yourself having to resend it, you may need to CC someone else, when you send the second or repeat email. After all, we know that nearly 50% of corporate work is reverse documentation, so why should your important emails be any different? Obviously, restraint is required for this tip. You can always pick up the phone (remember the telephone?) and call the person with whom you need to speak.

Do Unto Others:
Make sure that you get back quickly to those who email you. You can’t complain about others, if you’re guilty of the same offense.

As a funny motivational speaker and funny keynote speaker, I send a ton of emails. By following these tips, I, have found that I receive a higher response rate, than when I don’t. Therefore, these tips may also increase the chances of your emails being read and replied to …even by those in the corporate world.

©2013 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the whole article, the byline and author resource links.

Bill Cosby once said, “Through humor, you can soften some of the worst blows that life delivers.” Humor is the saving grace that allows people to cope with life. It can be used to poke fun at a situation or lighten up a conversation. The benefits of having a sharp sense humor from a personal/health standpoint are obvious. After all – laughter is the best medicine; however, it can also be beneficial in the workplace.

According to the “The Humor Project,” over 98% of the 737 CEOs interviewed stated they would much rather hire someone with a sense of humor over someone who didn’t have one. Therefore, spending a little energy to hone that sense may not only be beneficial personally, but also professionally. Here are a few tips to help you sharpen your sense of humor.

1) Watch and Read the Masters
Jack Benny, George Burns, and Groucho Marx are just a few of the masters of humor and wit. Their timing was impeccable and their humor is timeless. Watching these humorists can aid you in developing your own sense of humor. Additionally, read the works of Twain, Wilde, Thurber and other similar humorist. Research witty sayings from people like Winston Churchill. Time spent doing so will not only bring a smile to your face, but also acts as training course in humor. If you find something that “tickles your funny bone,” see Step 2.

2) Start a Humor Log
The vast majority of comedians write out their material, and most keep notes on what works and what does not. Therefore, if you want to “seriously” sharpen your sense of humor, start keeping a journal or notes on what you think is funny or witty.

You can pull quotes and sayings from a variety of resources – from books or off of the internet. Like comedians, categorize them in a way that makes sense to you and then, periodically, go over your notes, so that you are always prepared. For example, you may have a category about that often discussed (but rarely applied) term of teamwork. When your boss starts chatting away regarding the need for everyone to stop thinking about themselves and start working together as a team, a humorous quip to toss into the conversation might be, “Well, it’s true there are no “I’s” in teamwork, but there are two of them in martini.” (I assume your boss has a sense of humor. If not, have him/her read this article.)

Maybe, you could have a category for that fun topic which always seems to pop up at weird times, like during year end holiday parties or birthdays – death. Should you be discussing death with your friends or local undertaker, you might lighten up the mood with, “Well, as Woody Allen once said, “I’m not afraid of death: I just don’t want to be there when it happens.” Not only is that snappy, but it also makes you appear to be witty and “well-read.” Bravo!

3) Say Less and Observe More
While saying less seems odd when writing about being humorous, actually it is very fitting. Humor and wit are based on observation – observing a situation or your own or other people’s behavior – and then making a comment.

In comedy, timing is everything. Making what you think is a humorous comment at the wrong time can give one the appearance of being insensitive or crass. Prior to making a comment, observe the situation and those around you and determine if your humorous quip will lighten the pain or add to it. This should take seconds for any intelligent person to ascertain. The best advice came from Johnny Carson, which was, “If you have to think about it – don’t say it.”

4) Aim for Home
The easiest target for your humor should be yourself. Many people feel that in order to be humorous, it’s more fun to insult others. In his book “How to be Funny,” Steve Allen wrote, “If you feel that the comedy of insult is your most natural style, good luck to you. And you’ll need it.” Few can pull off insulting others while not appearing to be unintelligent or uncaring. True, people point to Groucho Marx as an insult king; however, as Allen points out, “Because his image was almost that of a comic-strip character, most of his acerbic remarks did not give offence.”

I assume that your image is not that of a comic-strip; therefore, tread lightly when using your humor to make fun of others. If you research some of the masters mentioned above, you will see that much of their humor was pointed at themselves. Making light of one’s self or one’s situation is the perfect way to add humor to a conversation.

5) Hang with Funny People
If you wanted to be a better tennis player, you would link up with good tennis players. If you want to sharpen your sense of humor, hang with funny people. If you’ve followed Steps 1 and 2, then you will be welcomed to the conversation of most people who have a heightened sense of humor. (You might even be welcomed to the groups of people who lack a sense of humor – but why would want to hang with those people?)

Watch funny movies. Go to comedy shows of present day comedians who “work clean” like Ellen DeGeneres, Rita Rudner, and Louie Anderson. (I emphasize “work clean,” because true humor and wit doesn’t involve dirty language or the use of “bathroom humor.” Most present day comedians can’t go 5 minutes without using a four-letter word or talking about sex or bodily functions.) Other funny people can aid you in sharpening your sense of humor. And now for the last tip…drum roll please…

If you follow the above suggestions, the last tip will be easier, which is that much like doing stand-up comedy – you have to get out there and just do it! As a funny motivational speaker and funny keynote speaker, I have to have a fairly sharp sense of humor and I know these 5 tips will help you sharpen your sense of humor.

©2012 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the whole article, the byline and author resource links.

Convention and conference planners understand that with tight budgets, the advent of web meetings, and more companies than ever before hosting their own customer events, conference trade shows have taken a bit of a hit. Some conferences have vanished, while others have had to combine with other shows in order to stay alive. True, there are some conventions that are still robust, yet the footprint of many companies at those shows has been reduced.

Despite cutbacks, one concern that affects a company’s decision to exhibit at a show is whether they receive a quantifiable ROI from their participation. While conferences do make money from attendees, they also make a huge amount from exhibitors via exhibiting fees, sponsorships, and advertising opportunities at the show. Therefore, it would be in the conference planner’s (and conference management company’s) interest to aid exhibitors in receiving that ROI. The following are a few things that meeting and conference managers can do to make that happen:

1) Non-Conflicting Show Hours:
Probably the largest complaint from exhibitors is having the exhibit floor open while there are sessions running. Oftentimes, the traffic is light to non-existent and exhibitors view this as a waste of time.

Conducting sessions concurrently during exhibit floor hours forces your attendees to choose between attending sessions (for CEUs, personal interest, etc.) and visiting exhibitor’s booths. Depending on the industry, you may be required to supply a certain amount of educational hours. However, don’t keep the hall open at those times. Instead, start the sessions earlier or open the hall later. Possibly hold a session or two in the exhibit hall. This gives attendees the freedom to attend the session, while others can visit the booths.

2) Lunch is Not Hall Time:
Some conference planners still insist on having lunch in the exhibit hall and then starting up sessions shortly thereafter. By the time attendees have gotten through the food line and have eaten, there needs to be time for those attendees to visit the booths. Try to keep the hall open – with no conflicting sessions – for an hour or more after lunch. This not only helps your exhibitors, but also aids your attendees, as they do want to spend quality time with exhibitors without being rushed.

3) Talk to Exhibitors:
Make sure your staff actually visits all of the exhibitors – not just the large booths – and asks them for feedback. Make sure that the staff listens and backs up those conversations with viable actions.

4) Trade Show Police:
While every booth should adhere to the rules, don’t go overboard and run the show like it’s the military. I have seen small exhibits attacked for minor infractions, while larger booths get carte blanche. Remember, this is a trade show where companies are competing for the time and attention of attendees. While some companies spend money and time creating ways to attract attendees, others do not – and these are the exhibits that do most of the complaining. Again, there are rules, but they need to be flexible. A trade show is not a library or a high level meeting room. There will be noise, contests, attractions, and attendees in the aisles. As long as the noise is not overbearing and the aisles are relatively clear, then let the companies do what they do, which is compete.

Following these simple steps will aid your exhibitors in realizing a higher ROI from participating at your conference. While they seem simple and logical, many conferences planners and convention planners do not take them into consideration. Hence, why many companies have lessened their footprint at trade shows or have decided not to go at all. As a conference or meeting planner, it’s important to take all parties of your event – attendees and exhibitors – into consideration. After all, both are your customer, and part of your job is to help them to come together – so that all may benefit from being at your show.

With nearly 30 years of experience at trade shows, Bob Garner has seen it all. A trade show magician with clients worldwide, Bob has also counseled many of these clients on what shows to attend and how to exhibit. As one of the most respected trade show magicians in the business, Bob helps his clients achieve a high ROI.

©2012 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the byline and author resource.

You have everything set for your employee appreciation event or customer appreciation event. Your CEO introduces the funny speaker or entertainment for the evening and then, slowly, everything comes crashing to a halt. Instead of the laughter and applause that you hoped to hear, you hear silence and heavy sighs. The talent, which you thought was the perfect corporate entertainer for your group, panics and starts insulting the audience. You slowly slink down into your chair and wonder if your resume is up-to-date.

As Maya Angelou once said, “People will forget what you said and forget what you did, but they will never forget how you made them feel.” While the food may be great and the room looks beautiful, these will be quickly forgotten. What your group won’t forget is how miserable they felt watching the entertainer you chose to add some “fun” and excitement” to your event. It’s odd that, sometimes, an events manager will spend months on planning certain aspects of an event – food, hotel, decorations, etc – but wait to the last minute to book the proper corporate event entertainment.

Whether you are looking to energize your event with a funny motivational speaker or just looking for some evening entertainment, here are a few corporate event entertainment ideas that will help you to make the right choice of a corporate entertainer for your next meeting or event.

1) Hit Your Homework – Stop relying on a speaker’s agency or entertainment agency to always book your talent. Many leading corporate entertainers don’t necessarily work with agents and, therefore, you can miss out on some great talent. While agents can be a good source for talent, they are not the only way to go. Don’t think that just because a corporate entertainer is on the agent’s roster that the agent has actually worked with that talent. Should you be willing to “broaden your options,” do a Google search for terms like funny motivational speaker or entertaining motivational speaker. Here you will find many corporate entertainers that can help you add the “WOW” factor to your event.

2) Delve into the Demos – Once you have chosen an entertainer or two, carefully watch the talent’s demo and see if he/she is a good fit for your group. This is the fastest way to confirm that the particular entertainer will work for you and saves you time – because if you don’t like the video, you can quickly move on to your next candidate. While watching the demo, see if the talent has worked for similar groups. Notice the demographics of the group. Does the video reveal crowd reactions? Is the laughter and applause real or is it canned? Are there multiple performance clips or is the video mostly one performance? Did the corporate entertainer receive multiple standing ovations or just one?

3) Survey the Site – If you like the demo, peruse the talent’s site to see exactly what type of corporate entertainment he/she provides. Observe if the corporate entertainer has a number of program options.

Additionally, look at the companies for which the talent has worked and then read those company’s testimonials. Many corporate entertainers flash logos of companies on their site; however, when checking for testimonials from those companies on the talent’s site, those testimonials may not be present. If a talent is showing a logo of a company, it delivers the assumption that he/she has worked with that company and, therefore, logically, the talent should have a testimonial to back up that claim. If they don’t, then what should you assume?

4) Testimonials are Tops – Video testimonials have taken the place of referrals. Instead of having to call someone to get a referral on a talent, a video testimonial will tell you everything you need to know. What you should look for in a video testimonial is who is giving the testimonial and what they said. The testimonial should be from the person who booked the talent and – for corporate event entertainment – that should be from an events manager, marketing or sales executive or higher.

Audience member testimonials are fine; however, you want to hear from someone in corporate who actually booked the talent. Since most corporate entertainers who are good at their job have been doing it for some time, the written testimonials will, undoubtedly, outweigh those on video. However, there should be enough video testimonials to provide you with solid information as to the quality of the service you can expect from the entertainer. 

5) Talk to the Talent – Once you have accessed that a particular corporate entertainer may be perfect for your employee appreciation event or client appreciation event, then contact the talent directly. A few minutes on the phone will shed some light on how well the talent will not only work for your group, but also work with you.

As with all events, flexibility is the key. If your talent has too many demands or needs, then you may need to look elsewhere. After all, you are dealing with the demands and needs of your group and your executives. You don’t need a “needy” entertainer, as well. During your call discuss fees, staging requirements and, most importantly, how the entertainer can help you add the “WOW” factor to your event.

Bottom line: Taking the time to find the right corporate entertainer for your corporate event entertainment does require “time.” However, event managers take the time to: plan multiple site visits; make copious calls to hotel catering; agonize over decorations, strategize hotel bookings and loads more to make sure the event is a success. Don’t let your decision for your corporate event entertainment be one of the last things you do, and don’t always leave it up to one source. Remember, your group probably won’t remember exactly what they ate or the details of the decorations on the table, but they will never forget how miserable they felt watching a lousy corporate entertainer.

These are just a few corporate event entertainment ideas that will allow you to provide the right type of entertainment at your next meeting.  As a funny motivational speaker, I have logged numerous events as a speaker, as well as the evening’s entertainment. View my corporate event entertainment site.

©2012 Bob Garner. All Rights Reserved. You may use this article, but you must use the byline and author resource.

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